Forever Fascinated
Forever Fascinated
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englishsnow:

Lucas Anderson
englishsnow:

Lucas Anderson
englishsnow:

Lucas Anderson
englishsnow:

Lucas Anderson
englishsnow:

Lucas Anderson
englishsnow:

Lucas Anderson
englishsnow:

Lucas Anderson
englishsnow:

Lucas Anderson
englishsnow:

Lucas Anderson
englishsnow:

Lucas Anderson
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lookbookdotnu:

She don’t make me nervous, she don’t talk too much (by Abbey E.)
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Dolce Gabbana ss14 + hair colors | inspired by (+)

Dolce Gabbana ss14 + hair colors | inspired by (+)

Dolce Gabbana ss14 + hair colors | inspired by (+)

Dolce Gabbana ss14 + hair colors | inspired by (+)

Dolce Gabbana ss14 + hair colors | inspired by (+)

Dolce Gabbana ss14 + hair colors | inspired by (+)

Dolce Gabbana ss14 + hair colors | inspired by (+)

Dolce Gabbana ss14 + hair colors | inspired by (+)

Dolce Gabbana ss14 + hair colors | inspired by (+)
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prettyarchitecture:

Meditation House Plans: “Floating”
Architect David Jameson was inspired by a tea house idea when he developed this subtle yet stunning meditation house plan. Consisting of a volume suspended within a frame, Japanese architecture inspired this glass and steel home as a space for meditation, relaxation and reflection. 
In contrast to its floor-to-ceiling glazed walls, a solid wood door welcomes you in, complementing the natural woody surroundings while providing a sure separation between indoors and out, raw and refined, wild and sophisticated. Illuminated only by floor lamps, this forest home is a glowing beacon in the night air. David Jamesonvia Freshome
Want to see more Architecture? Follow Pretty Architecture!
prettyarchitecture:

Meditation House Plans: “Floating”
Architect David Jameson was inspired by a tea house idea when he developed this subtle yet stunning meditation house plan. Consisting of a volume suspended within a frame, Japanese architecture inspired this glass and steel home as a space for meditation, relaxation and reflection. 
In contrast to its floor-to-ceiling glazed walls, a solid wood door welcomes you in, complementing the natural woody surroundings while providing a sure separation between indoors and out, raw and refined, wild and sophisticated. Illuminated only by floor lamps, this forest home is a glowing beacon in the night air. David Jamesonvia Freshome
Want to see more Architecture? Follow Pretty Architecture!
prettyarchitecture:

Meditation House Plans: “Floating”
Architect David Jameson was inspired by a tea house idea when he developed this subtle yet stunning meditation house plan. Consisting of a volume suspended within a frame, Japanese architecture inspired this glass and steel home as a space for meditation, relaxation and reflection. 
In contrast to its floor-to-ceiling glazed walls, a solid wood door welcomes you in, complementing the natural woody surroundings while providing a sure separation between indoors and out, raw and refined, wild and sophisticated. Illuminated only by floor lamps, this forest home is a glowing beacon in the night air. David Jamesonvia Freshome
Want to see more Architecture? Follow Pretty Architecture!
prettyarchitecture:

Meditation House Plans: “Floating”
Architect David Jameson was inspired by a tea house idea when he developed this subtle yet stunning meditation house plan. Consisting of a volume suspended within a frame, Japanese architecture inspired this glass and steel home as a space for meditation, relaxation and reflection. 
In contrast to its floor-to-ceiling glazed walls, a solid wood door welcomes you in, complementing the natural woody surroundings while providing a sure separation between indoors and out, raw and refined, wild and sophisticated. Illuminated only by floor lamps, this forest home is a glowing beacon in the night air. David Jamesonvia Freshome
Want to see more Architecture? Follow Pretty Architecture!
prettyarchitecture:

Meditation House Plans: “Floating”
Architect David Jameson was inspired by a tea house idea when he developed this subtle yet stunning meditation house plan. Consisting of a volume suspended within a frame, Japanese architecture inspired this glass and steel home as a space for meditation, relaxation and reflection. 
In contrast to its floor-to-ceiling glazed walls, a solid wood door welcomes you in, complementing the natural woody surroundings while providing a sure separation between indoors and out, raw and refined, wild and sophisticated. Illuminated only by floor lamps, this forest home is a glowing beacon in the night air. David Jamesonvia Freshome
Want to see more Architecture? Follow Pretty Architecture!
prettyarchitecture:

Meditation House Plans: “Floating”
Architect David Jameson was inspired by a tea house idea when he developed this subtle yet stunning meditation house plan. Consisting of a volume suspended within a frame, Japanese architecture inspired this glass and steel home as a space for meditation, relaxation and reflection. 
In contrast to its floor-to-ceiling glazed walls, a solid wood door welcomes you in, complementing the natural woody surroundings while providing a sure separation between indoors and out, raw and refined, wild and sophisticated. Illuminated only by floor lamps, this forest home is a glowing beacon in the night air. David Jamesonvia Freshome
Want to see more Architecture? Follow Pretty Architecture!
prettyarchitecture:

Meditation House Plans: “Floating”
Architect David Jameson was inspired by a tea house idea when he developed this subtle yet stunning meditation house plan. Consisting of a volume suspended within a frame, Japanese architecture inspired this glass and steel home as a space for meditation, relaxation and reflection. 
In contrast to its floor-to-ceiling glazed walls, a solid wood door welcomes you in, complementing the natural woody surroundings while providing a sure separation between indoors and out, raw and refined, wild and sophisticated. Illuminated only by floor lamps, this forest home is a glowing beacon in the night air. David Jamesonvia Freshome
Want to see more Architecture? Follow Pretty Architecture!
prettyarchitecture:

Meditation House Plans: “Floating”
Architect David Jameson was inspired by a tea house idea when he developed this subtle yet stunning meditation house plan. Consisting of a volume suspended within a frame, Japanese architecture inspired this glass and steel home as a space for meditation, relaxation and reflection. 
In contrast to its floor-to-ceiling glazed walls, a solid wood door welcomes you in, complementing the natural woody surroundings while providing a sure separation between indoors and out, raw and refined, wild and sophisticated. Illuminated only by floor lamps, this forest home is a glowing beacon in the night air. David Jamesonvia Freshome
Want to see more Architecture? Follow Pretty Architecture!
prettyarchitecture:

Meditation House Plans: “Floating”
Architect David Jameson was inspired by a tea house idea when he developed this subtle yet stunning meditation house plan. Consisting of a volume suspended within a frame, Japanese architecture inspired this glass and steel home as a space for meditation, relaxation and reflection. 
In contrast to its floor-to-ceiling glazed walls, a solid wood door welcomes you in, complementing the natural woody surroundings while providing a sure separation between indoors and out, raw and refined, wild and sophisticated. Illuminated only by floor lamps, this forest home is a glowing beacon in the night air. David Jamesonvia Freshome
Want to see more Architecture? Follow Pretty Architecture!
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lustik:

Adrian Lopez Crego via Liqen
Artists on tumblr
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Adrian Lopez Crego via Liqen
Artists on tumblr
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Adrian Lopez Crego via Liqen
Artists on tumblr
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Adrian Lopez Crego via Liqen
Artists on tumblr
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Adrian Lopez Crego via Liqen
Artists on tumblr
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Adrian Lopez Crego via Liqen
Artists on tumblr
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
lustik:

Adrian Lopez Crego via Liqen
Artists on tumblr
Lustik:  twitter | pinterest | etsy
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worclip:

Humo by Studio Nocc for Designer Box N°14

Humo is an atypical object imagined by Studio Nocc - the creative power duo of Juan Pablo Naranjo and Jean Christophe Orthlieb. For Designer Box, they explored humour within this object whose essence is to play with fire!
Censer or ashtray, Humo holds in the smoke, transforming a volatile matter into complementary poetry to the object.
worclip:

Humo by Studio Nocc for Designer Box N°14

Humo is an atypical object imagined by Studio Nocc - the creative power duo of Juan Pablo Naranjo and Jean Christophe Orthlieb. For Designer Box, they explored humour within this object whose essence is to play with fire!
Censer or ashtray, Humo holds in the smoke, transforming a volatile matter into complementary poetry to the object.
worclip:

Humo by Studio Nocc for Designer Box N°14

Humo is an atypical object imagined by Studio Nocc - the creative power duo of Juan Pablo Naranjo and Jean Christophe Orthlieb. For Designer Box, they explored humour within this object whose essence is to play with fire!
Censer or ashtray, Humo holds in the smoke, transforming a volatile matter into complementary poetry to the object.
worclip:

Humo by Studio Nocc for Designer Box N°14

Humo is an atypical object imagined by Studio Nocc - the creative power duo of Juan Pablo Naranjo and Jean Christophe Orthlieb. For Designer Box, they explored humour within this object whose essence is to play with fire!
Censer or ashtray, Humo holds in the smoke, transforming a volatile matter into complementary poetry to the object.
worclip:

Humo by Studio Nocc for Designer Box N°14

Humo is an atypical object imagined by Studio Nocc - the creative power duo of Juan Pablo Naranjo and Jean Christophe Orthlieb. For Designer Box, they explored humour within this object whose essence is to play with fire!
Censer or ashtray, Humo holds in the smoke, transforming a volatile matter into complementary poetry to the object.
worclip:

Humo by Studio Nocc for Designer Box N°14

Humo is an atypical object imagined by Studio Nocc - the creative power duo of Juan Pablo Naranjo and Jean Christophe Orthlieb. For Designer Box, they explored humour within this object whose essence is to play with fire!
Censer or ashtray, Humo holds in the smoke, transforming a volatile matter into complementary poetry to the object.
worclip:

Humo by Studio Nocc for Designer Box N°14

Humo is an atypical object imagined by Studio Nocc - the creative power duo of Juan Pablo Naranjo and Jean Christophe Orthlieb. For Designer Box, they explored humour within this object whose essence is to play with fire!
Censer or ashtray, Humo holds in the smoke, transforming a volatile matter into complementary poetry to the object.
worclip:

Humo by Studio Nocc for Designer Box N°14

Humo is an atypical object imagined by Studio Nocc - the creative power duo of Juan Pablo Naranjo and Jean Christophe Orthlieb. For Designer Box, they explored humour within this object whose essence is to play with fire!
Censer or ashtray, Humo holds in the smoke, transforming a volatile matter into complementary poetry to the object.
worclip:

Humo by Studio Nocc for Designer Box N°14

Humo is an atypical object imagined by Studio Nocc - the creative power duo of Juan Pablo Naranjo and Jean Christophe Orthlieb. For Designer Box, they explored humour within this object whose essence is to play with fire!
Censer or ashtray, Humo holds in the smoke, transforming a volatile matter into complementary poetry to the object.
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newsweek:

For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
newsweek:

For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
newsweek:

For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
newsweek:

For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
newsweek:

For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
newsweek:

For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
newsweek:

For the past several years photographer Marisa Scheinfeld has been photographing the end of the Borscht Belt in the Catskills, a region in upstate New York once known as a vacation destination away from the chaos of New York City.
In the early decades of its heyday, the Catskills were a potent and affordable draw for Jews seeking to escape the suffocating heat, grating work conditions and antisemitism they endured in the city. Nicknamed, the Borscht Belt and the Jewish Alps, over time it outlived it’s usefulness as Jews assimilated.
“It all seems to be ending. You think kids want to come with their parents and take foxtrot lessons? Trips to Europe, that’s what the kids want. Twenty-two countries in three days. It feels like it’s all slipping away,” says fictional Catskills resort owner Max Kellerman in the 1987 film Dirty Dancing. The movie, set during the summer of 1963, captured the region at the start of its gradual decline. Air conditioning and the rise of suburbia made summers at home easier to stomach. The thriving airline industry opened up exciting new vacation destinations. American Jews no longer needed a place all their own. And as the big hotel chains grew, they took business away from small hotels, bungalow colonies and local economies.
See more of Scheinfeld’s work at: http://www.newsweek.com/photographing-end-borscht-belt-catskills-269649
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"So what? You failed your finals. You gained some weight. So what? You’re single again. You lost your job. So what? What now? You live. You try again. That’s what."
(via soulsscrawl)
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spunkai:

more lame drawings I’m sorry
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englishsnow:

London by bendisdonc
englishsnow:

London by bendisdonc
englishsnow:

London by bendisdonc
englishsnow:

London by bendisdonc
englishsnow:

London by bendisdonc
englishsnow:

London by bendisdonc
englishsnow:

London by bendisdonc
englishsnow:

London by bendisdonc
englishsnow:

London by bendisdonc
englishsnow:

London by bendisdonc
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